policies & procedures

Abuse Policy — Conditionally Approved

DEFINITIONS

The following terms have these meanings in this Policy:

  • “Vulnerable Individuals” – Includes children / youth (minors) and vulnerable adults (people who, because of age, disability or other circumstance, are in a position of dependence on others or are otherwise at a greater risk than the general population of being harmed by people in positions of trust or authority).
  • “Individuals” – All categories of membership defined in the CPSABC bylaws, as well as all individuals employed by, or engaged in activities with, the CPSABC including, but not limited to, volunteers, managers, administrators, committee members, and directors and officers of the CPSABC
  • “Abuse” – Child / youth abuse or vulnerable adult abuse as described in this Policy.

 

PURPOSE

The CPSABC is committed to a sport environment free from abuse. The purpose of this Policy is to stress the importance of that commitment by educating individuals about abuse, outlining how the CPSABC will work to prevent abuse, and how abuse or suspected abuse can be reported to and addressed by the CPSABC.

 

ZERO TOLERANCE STATEMENT

The CPSABC has zero tolerance for any type of abuse. Individuals are required to report instances of abuse or suspected abuse to the CPSABC to be immediately addressed under the terms of the applicable policy.

EDUCATION – WHAT IS ABUSE?

Vulnerable individuals can be abused in different forms.

The following description of Child / Youth Abuse has been modified and adapted from Ecclesiastical’s Guidelines for Developing a Safety & Protection Policy for Children / Youth / Vulnerable Adults [1]:

Child / Youth Abuse

“Child Abuse” refers to the violence, mistreatment or neglect that a child or adolescent may experience while in the care of someone they depend on or trust. There are many different forms of abuse and a child may be subjected to more than one form:

 

  • Physical Abuse – Involves single or repeated instances of deliberately using force against a child in such a way that the child is either injured or is at risk of being injured. Physical abuse includes beating, hitting, shaking, pushing, choking, biting, burning, kicking or assaulting a child with a weapon. It also includes holding a child under water, or any other dangerous or harmful use of force or restraint.
  • Sexual Abuse and Exploitation – Involves using a child for sexual purposes. Examples of child sexual abuse include fondling, inviting a child to touch or be touched sexually, intercourse, rape, incest, sodomy, exhibitionism, or involving a child in prostitution or pornography.
  • Neglect – Is often chronic, and it usually involves repeated incidents. It involves failing to provide what a child needs for his or her physical, psychological or emotional development and well-being. For example, neglect includes failing to provide a dependent child with food, clothing, shelter, cleanliness, medical care, or protection from harm.
  • Emotional Abuse – Involves harming a child’s sense of self-worth. It includes acts (or omissions) that result in, or place a child at risk of, serious behavioural, cognitive, emotional, or mental health problems. For example, emotional abuse may include aggressive verbal threats, social isolation, intimidation, exploitation, or routinely making unreasonable demands. It also includes exposing the child to violence.

An abuser may use a number of different tactics to gain access to children, exert power and control over them, and prevent them from telling anyone about the abuse or seeking support. The abuse may happen once, or it may occur in a repeated and escalating pattern over a period of months or years. The abuse may change form over time.

Abuse of children or youth in sport can include emotional maltreatment, neglect, physical maltreatment and grooming:

  • Emotional Maltreatment – A coach’s failure to provide a developmentally-appropriate and supportive environment. Emotional abuse is at the foundation of all other forms of maltreatment (sexual, physical and neglect). In sports, this conduct has the potential to cause emotional or psychological harm to an athlete when it is persistent, pervasive or patterned acts (i.e., yelling at an athlete once does not constitute maltreatment). Examples of emotional maltreatment include:
    • Refusal to recognize an athlete’s worth or the legitimacy of an athlete’s needs (including complaints of injury/pain, thirst or feeling unwell)
    • Creating a culture of fear or threatening, bullying or frightening an athlete
    • Frequent name-calling or sarcasm that continually “beats down” an athlete’s self-esteem
    • Embarrassing or humiliating an athlete in front of peers
    • Excluding or isolating an athlete from the group
    • Withholding attention
    • Encouraging an athlete to engage in destructive and antisocial behaviour, reinforcing deviance, or impairing an athlete’s ability to behave in socially appropriate ways
    • Over-pressuring; whereby the coach imposes extreme pressure upon the athlete to behave and achieve in ways that are far beyond the athlete’s capabilities
    • Verbally attacking an athlete personally (e.g., belittling them or calling them worthless, lazy, useless, fat or disgusting)
    • Routinely or arbitrarily excluding athletes from practice
    • Using conditioning as punishment
    • Throwing sports equipment, water bottles or chairs at, or in the presence of, athletes
    • Body shaming – making disrespectful, hurtful or embarrassing comments about an athlete’s physique
  • Neglect – Acts of omission (i.e., the coach should act to protect the health/well-being of an athlete but does not). Examples of neglect include:
    • Isolating an athlete in a confined space or stranded on equipment, with no supervision, for an extended period
    • Withholding, recommending against, or denying adequate hydration, nutrition, medical attention or sleep
    • Ignoring an injury
    • Knowing about sexual abuse of an athlete but failing to report it
  • Physical Maltreatment – Involves contact or non-contact behaviour that can cause physical harm to an athlete. It also includes any act or conduct described as physical abuse or misconduct (e.g., child abuse, child neglect and assault). Almost all sport involves strenuous physical activity. Athletes regularly push themselves to the point of exhaustion. However, any activity that physically harms an athlete—such as extreme disciplinary actions or punishment—is unacceptable. Physical maltreatment can extend to seemingly unrelated areas including inadequate recovery times for injuries and restricted diet. Examples of physical maltreatment include:
    • Punching, beating, biting, striking, choking or slapping an athlete
    • Intentionally hitting an athlete with objects or sporting equipment
    • Providing alcohol to an athlete under the legal drinking age
    • Providing illegal drugs or non-prescribed medications to any athlete
    • Encouraging or permitting an athlete to return to play prematurely or without the clearance of a medical professional, following a serious injury (e.g., a concussion)
    • Prescribed dieting or other weight-control methods without regard for the nutritional well- being and health of an athlete
    • Forcing an athlete to assume a painful stance or position for no athletic purpose, or excessive repetition of a skill to the point of injury
    • Using excessive exercise as punishment (e.g., stretching to the point of causing the athlete to cry, endurance conditioning until the athlete vomits)
  • Grooming – A slow gradual and escalating process of building comfort and trust with an athlete and/or their parents/guardian that is often very difficult to recognize. The process allows for inappropriate conduct to become normalized. It is often preceded by building confidence and comfort that an individual can be trusted with the care of the athlete. Examples of grooming include:
    • Nudity or exposure of genitals in the presence of an athlete
    • Sexually oriented conversation or discussions about personal sexual activities
    • Excessive discussions about a coach’s personal life outside of coaching (e.g., family, work, medical challenges)
    • Spending time with an individual athlete and/or their family outside of team activities
    • Excessive gift-giving to an individual athlete
    • Socially isolating an athlete
    • Restricting an athlete’s privacy
    • Providing drugs, alcohol or tobacco to an athlete
    • Becoming overly-involved in an athlete’s personal life
    • Making sexual or discriminatory jokes or comments to an athlete
    • Displaying material of a sexual nature in the presence of an athlete
    • Mocking or threatening an athlete
    • Putting coach’s needs above needs of athlete and/or going to athlete to have coach’s needs me

 

Importantly, emotional and physical maltreatment does not include professionally-accepted coaching methods (per the National Coaching Certification Program) of skill enhancement, physical conditioning, team building, discipline, or improving athletic performance.

Potential warning signs of abuse of children or youth can include [2][3]:

  • Recurrent, unexplained injuries
  • Alert behaviour; child seems to always be expecting something bad to happen
  • Often wears clothing that covers up their skin, even in warm weather
  • Child startles easily, shies away from touch or shows other skittish behaviour
  • Constantly seems fearful or anxious about doing something wrong
  • Withdrawn from peers and adults
  • Behavior fluctuates between extremes (e.g., extremely cooperative or extremely demanding)
  • Acting either inappropriately beyond their age (like an adult; taking care of other children) or inappropriately younger than their age (like an infant; throwing tantrums)
  • Acting out in an inappropriate sexual way with toys or objects
  • New adult words for body parts and no obvious source
  • Self-harm (e.g., cutting, burning or other harmful activities)
  • Not wanting to be alone with a particular child or young person

 

Vulnerable Adult Abuse

Although individuals may be abused at virtually any life stage—childhood, adolescence, young adulthood, middle age, or old age—the nature and consequences of abuse may differ depending on an individual’s situation, disability, or circumstance.

The following description of vulnerable adult abuse has been modified and adapted from Ecclesiastical’s Guidelines for Developing a Safety & Protection Policy for Children / Youth / Vulnerable Adults [1].

Abuse of vulnerable adults is often described as a misuse of power and a violation of trust. Abusers may use a number of different tactics to exert power and control over their victims. Abuse may happen once, or it may occur in a repeated and escalating pattern over months or years. The abuse may take many different forms, which may change over time.

  • Psychological Abuse – Includes attempts to dehumanize or intimidate vulnerable adults. Any verbal or non-verbal act that reduces their sense of self-worth or dignity and threatens their psychological and emotional integrity is abuse. This type of abuse may include, for example:
    • Threatening to use violence
    • Threatening to abandon them
    • Intentionally frightening them
    • Making them fear that they will not receive the food or care they need
    • Lying to them
    • Failing to check allegations of abuse against them
  • Financial Abuse – Encompasses financial manipulation or exploitation, including theft, fraud, forgery, or extortion. It includes using a vulnerable adult’s money or property in a dishonest manner or failing to use a vulnerable adult’s assets for their welfare. Abuse occurs any time someone acts without consent in a way that financially or personally benefits one person at the expense of another. This type of abuse against a vulnerable adult may include:
    • Stealing their money, disability cheques, or other possessions
    • Wrongfully using a Power of Attorney
    • Failing to pay back borrowed money when asked
  • Physical Abuse – Includes any act of violence – whether or not it results in physical injury. Intentionally inflicting pain or injury that results in either bodily harm or mental distress is abuse. Physical abuse may include:
    • Beating
    • Burning or scalding
    • Pushing or shoving
    • Hitting or slapping
    • Rough handling
    • Tripping
    • Spitting
  • Emotional Maltreatment – A coach’s failure to provide a developmentally-appropriate and supportive environment. Emotional abuse is at the foundation of all other forms of maltreatment (sexual, physical and neglect). In sports, this conduct has the potential to cause emotional or psychological harm to an athlete when it is persistent, pervasive or patterned acts (i.e., yelling at an athlete once does not constitute maltreatment). Examples of emotional maltreatment include:
    • Refusal to recognize an athlete’s worth or the legitimacy of an athlete’s needs (including complaints of injury/pain, thirst or feeling unwell)
    • Creating a culture of fear or threatening, bullying or frightening an athlete
    • Frequent name-calling or sarcasm that continually “beats down” an athlete’s self-esteem
    • Embarrassing or humiliating an athlete in front of peers
    • Excluding or isolating an athlete from the group
    • Withholding attention
    • Encouraging an athlete to engage in destructive and antisocial behaviour, reinforcing deviance, or impairing an athlete’s ability to behave in socially appropriate ways
    • Over-pressuring; whereby the coach imposes extreme pressure upon the athlete to behave and achieve in ways that are far beyond the athlete’s capabilities
    • Verbally attacking an athlete personally (e.g., belittling them or calling them worthless, lazy, useless, fat or disgusting)
    • Routinely or arbitrarily excluding athletes from practice
    • Using conditioning as punishment
    • Throwing sports equipment, water bottles or chairs at, or in the presence of, athletes
    • Body shaming – making disrespectful, hurtful or embarrassing comments about an athlete’s physique
  • Neglect – Acts of omission (i.e., the coach should act to protect the health/well-being of an athlete but does not). Examples of neglect include:
    • Isolating an athlete in a confined space or stranded on equipment, with no supervision, for an extended period
    • Withholding, recommending against, or denying adequate hydration, nutrition, medical attention or sleep
    • Ignoring an injury
    • Knowing about sexual abuse of an athlete but failing to report it
  • All forms of sexual abuse are also applicable to vulnerable adults

Potential warning signs of abuse of vulnerable adults can include:

  • Depression, fear, anxiety, passivity
  • Unexplained and/or recurrent physical injuries
  • Dehydration, malnutrition, or lack of food
  • Poor hygiene, rashes, pressure sores
  • Over-sedation

 

PREVENTING ABUSE

The CPSABC will enact measures aimed at preventing abuse. These measures include screening, orientation, training, practice, and monitoring.

Screening

Individuals who coach, volunteer, officiate, deliver developmental programs, are affiliated with provincial teams, accompany a team to an event or competition, are paid staff, or otherwise engage with vulnerable individuals involved with the CPSABC will be screened according to the organization’s Screening Policy.

The CPSABC will use the Screening Policy to determine the level of trust, authority, and access that each individual has with vulnerable individuals. Each level of risk will be accompanied by increased screening procedures which may include the following, singularly or in combination:

  • Completing an Application Form for the position sought (which includes alerting individuals that they must agree to adhere with the organization’s policies and procedures, including this Abuse Policy)
  • Completing a Screening Declaration Form
  • Providing letters of reference
  • Providing a Criminal Record Check (“CRC”) and/or Vulnerable Sector Check (“VSC”)
  • Providing a driver’s abstract (for individuals who transport vulnerable individuals)
  • Other screening procedures, as required

An individual’s failure to participate in the screening process or pass the screening requirements as determined by a Screening Committee, will result in the individual’s ineligibility for the position sought.

Orientation and Training

  • The CPSABC will deliver orientation and training to those individuals who have access to, or interact with, vulnerable individuals. The orientation and training, and their frequency, will be based on the level of risk, as described in the Screening Policy.
  • Orientation may include, but is not limited to: introductory presentations, facility tours, equipment demonstrations, parent/athlete meetings, meetings with colleagues and supervisors, orientation manuals, orientation sessions, and increased supervision during initial tasks or period of engagement.
  • Training may include, but is not limited to: certification courses, online learning, mentoring, workshop sessions, webinars, on-site demonstrations, and peer feedback.
  • At the conclusion of the orientation and training, individuals will be required to acknowledge, in written form, that they have received and completed the training.

Practice

When individuals interact with vulnerable individuals, they are required to enact certain practical approaches to these interactions. These include, but are not limited to:

  • Limiting physical interactions to non-threatening or non-sexual touching (e.g., high-fives, pats on the back or shoulder, handshakes, specific skill instruction)
  • Ensuring that vulnerable individuals are always supervised by more than one adult
  • Ensuring that more than one person is involved with team selection (thereby limiting the consolidation of power onto one individual)
  • Including parents/guardians in all communication (e.g., electronic, telephonic) with vulnerable individuals
  • Ensuring that parents/guardians are aware that some non-personal communication between individuals and vulnerable individuals (e.g., coaches and athletes) may take place electronically (e.g., by texting) and that this type of communication is now considered to be commonplace, especially with older vulnerable individuals (e.g., teenagers). Individuals are aware that such communication is subject to the CPSABC Code of Conduct and Ethics Policy and Social Media Policy.
  • When traveling with vulnerable individuals, the individual will not transport vulnerable individuals without another adult present and will not stay in the same overnight accommodation location without additional adult supervision.

Monitoring

  • The CPSABC will regularly monitor those individuals who have access to, or interact with, vulnerable individuals. The monitoring will be based on the level of risk, as described in the Screening Policy.
  • Monitoring may include, but is not limited to: regular status reports, logs, supervisor meetings, supervisor on-site check-ins, feedback provided directly to the organization (from peers and parents/athletes), and regular evaluations.

 

REPORTING ABUSE

  • Reports of abuse that are shared confidentially with an individual by a vulnerable individual may require the individual to report the incident to parents/guardians, the CPSABC or the police. Individuals must respond to such reports in a non-judgemental, supportive and comforting manner but must also explain that the report may need to be escalated to the proper authority or to the vulnerable individual’s parent/guardian.
  • Complaints or reports that describe an element of abuse will be addressed by the process(es) described in the CPSABC Discipline and Complaints Policy and the Investigations Policy – Discrimination, Harassment and Abuse.
  1. Retrieved from: https://www.ecclesiastical.ca/guidelines_developsafetyprotectionpolicy_children-youths- vulnerableadults_faith/
  2. Adapted from: https://www.all4kids.org/2014/03/04/warning-signs-child-abuse-neglect/
  3. Adapted from: https://www.parentsprotect.co.uk/warning_signs.htm


Download the Abuse Policy PDF

Appeals Policy — Conditionally Approved

DEFINITIONS

The following terms have these meanings in this Policy:

  • “Appellant” – The Party appealing a decision
  • “Association” – The Cerebral Palsy Sports Association of British Columbia
  • “Respondent” – The body whose decision is being appealed
  • “Case Manager” – An individual appointed by the Association, who need not be a member or affiliated with the Association, as described in the CPSA’BCs Discipline and Complaints Policy to oversee management and administration of appeals.
  • “Parties” – The Appellant, Respondent, and any other Members or persons affected by the appeal
  • “Days” – Days including weekends and holidays
  • “Individuals” – All categories of membership defined in the Association’s Bylaws, as well as all individuals employed by or engaged in activities with the Association including, but not limited to, athletes, coaches, support persons, officials, volunteers, managers, administrators, committee members, and directors and officers of the Association.
  • “In writing” –  A letter, fax or email sent directly to the Association.

PURPOSE

The Association is committed to providing an environment in which all Individuals involved with the Association are treated with respect and fairness. The Association provides Individuals with this Appeal Policy to enable fair, affordable, and expedient appeals of certain decisions made by the Association. Further, some decisions made by the process outlined in the Association’s Discipline and Complaints Policy may be appealed under this Policy.

SCOPE + APPLICATION OF THIS POLICY

This Policy applies to all Individuals. Any Individual who is directly affected by an Association decision shall have the right to appeal that decision; provided there are sufficient grounds for the appeal under the ‘Grounds for Appeal’ section of this Policy.

This Policy will not apply to decisions relating to:

  • Employment
  • Infractions for doping offenses
  • The rules of the sport
  • Selection criteria, quotas, policies, and procedures established by entities other than the Association
  • Substance, content and establishment of team selection criteria
  • Volunteer/coach appointments and the withdrawal or termination of those appointments
  • Budgeting and budget implementation
  • The Association’s operational structure and committee appointments
  • Decisions or discipline arising within the business, activities, or events organized by entities other than the Association (appeals of these decisions shall be dealt with pursuant to the policies of those other entities unless requested and accepted by the Association at its sole discretion)
  • Commercial matters for which another appeals process exists under a contract or applicable law
  • Decisions made under this Policy

 

TIMING OF APPEAL

Individuals who wish to appeal a decision have seven (7) days from the date on which they received notice of the decision to submit, in writing to the Association, the following:

  • Notice of the intention to appeal
  • Contact information and status of the appellant
  • Name of the respondent and any affected parties, when known to the Appellant
  • Date the appellant was advised of the decision being appealed
  • A copy of the decision being appealed, or description of decision if written document is not available
  • Grounds for the appeal
  • Detailed reasons for the appeal
  • All evidence that supports these grounds
  • Requested remedy or remedies
  • An administration fee of one hundred dollars ($100)

An Individual who wishes to initiate an appeal beyond the seven (7) day period must provide a written request to the Association stating the reasons for an exemption. The decision to allow, or not allow, an appeal outside of the seven (7) day period will be at the sole discretion of the Case Manager and may not be appealed

 

GROUNDS FOR APPEAL

A decision cannot be appealed on its merits alone. An appeal may only be heard if there are sufficient grounds for appeal. Sufficient grounds include if the Respondent:

  • Made a decision that it did not have the authority or jurisdiction (as set out in the Respondent’s governing documents) to make
  • Failed to follow its own procedures (as set out in the Respondent’s governing documents)
  • Made a decision that was influenced by bias (where bias is defined as a lack of neutrality to such an extent that the decision-maker appears not to have considered other views)
  • Failed to consider relevant information or took into account irrelevant information in making the decision
  • Made a decision that was grossly unreasonable

 

The Appellant must demonstrate, on a balance of probabilities, that the Respondent has made a procedural error as described in the ‘Grounds for Appeal’ section of this Policy and that this error had, or may reasonably have had, a material effect on the decision or decision-maker.

SCREENING OF APPEAL

Upon receiving the notice of the appeal, the fee, and all other information (outlined in the ‘Timing of Appeal’ section of this Policy), the Association and the Appellant may first determine the appeal to be heard under the Association’s Dispute Resolution Policy.

Appeals resolved by mediation under the Association’s Dispute Resolution Policy will cause the administration fee to be refunded to the Appellant.

Should the appeal not be resolved by using the Dispute Resolution Policy, the Association will appoint an independent Case Manager who has the following responsibilities:

  • Determine if the appeal falls under the scope of this Policy
  • Determine if the appeal was submitted in a timely manner
  • Decide whether there are sufficient grounds for the appeal

If the appeal is denied on the basis of insufficient ground, because it was not submitted in a timely manner, or because it did not fall under the scope of this Policy, the Appellant will be notified, in writing, of the reasons for this decision. This decision may not be appealed.

If the Case Manager is satisfied there are sufficient grounds for an appeal, the Case Manager will appoint an Appeals Panel which shall consist of a single Adjudicator, to hear the appeal. In extraordinary circumstances, and at the discretion of the Case Manager, a Panel of three persons may be appointed to hear the appeal. In this event, the Case Manager will appoint one of the Panel’s members to serve as the Chair.

 

PROCEDURE FOR APPEAL HEARING

The Case Manager shall notify the Parties that the appeal will be heard. The Case Manager shall then decide the format under which the appeal will be heard. This decision is at the sole discretion of the Case Manager and may not be appealed.

If a Party chooses not to participate in the hearing, the hearing will proceed in any event.

The format of the hearing may involve an oral in-person hearing, an oral hearing by telephone or other electronic means, a hearing based on a review of documentary evidence submitted in advance of the hearing, or a combination of these methods. The Case Manager will ensure every reasonable effort is made to accommodate accessibility needs. The hearing will be governed by the procedures that the Case Manager and the Panel deem appropriate in the circumstances, provided that:

  • The hearing will be held within a timeline determined by the Case Manager
  • The Parties will be given reasonable notice of the day, time and place of the hearing
  • Copies of any written documents which the parties wish to have the Panel consider will be provided to all Parties in advance of the hearing
  • The Parties may be accompanied by a representative, advisor, or legal counsel at their own expense
  • The Panel may request that any other individual participate and give evidence at the hearing
  • The Panel may allow as evidence at the hearing any oral evidence and document or item(s) relevant to the subject matter of the appeal, but may exclude such evidence that is unduly repetitious and shall place such weight on the evidence as it deems appropriate
  • If a decision in the appeal may affect another party to the extent that the other party would have recourse to an appeal in their own right under this Policy, that party will become a party to the appeal in question and will be bound by its outcome
  • The decision to uphold or reject the appeal will be by a majority vote of Panel members

In fulfilling its duties, the Panel may obtain independent advice.

 

APPEAL DECISION

The Panel shall issue its decision, in writing and with reasons, after the hearing’s conclusion. In making its decision, the Panel will have no greater authority than that of the original decision-maker. The Panel may decide to:

  • Reject the appeal and confirm the decision being appealed
  • Uphold the appeal and refer the matter back to the initial decision-maker for a new decision
  • Uphold the appeal and vary the decision
  • Determine whether costs of the appeal, excluding legal fees and legal disbursements of any Parties, will be assessed against any Party. In assessing costs, the Panel will take into account the outcome of the appeal, the conduct of the Parties, and the Parties’ respective financial resources

The Panel’s written decision, with reasons, will be distributed to all Parties, the Case Manager, and the Association. In extraordinary circumstances, the Panel may first issue a verbal or summary decision soon after the hearing’s conclusion, with the full written decision to be issued thereafter. The decision will be considered a matter of public record unless decided otherwise by the Panel and as such other individuals or organizations may be advised of any decisions rendered in accordance with this Policy including but not limited to, national sport organizations, provincial partners, stakeholders, etc.

TIMELINES

If the circumstances of the appeal are such that adhering to the timelines outlined by this Policy will not allow a timely resolution to the appeal, the Case Manager and/or Panel may direct that these timelines be revised.

CONFIDENTIALITY

The appeals process is confidential and involves only the Parties, the Case Manager, the Panel, and any independent advisors to the Panel. Once initiated and until a decision is released, none of the Parties will disclose confidential information to any person not involved in the proceedings.

 

FINAL AND BINDING

The decision of the Panel will be binding on the Parties and on all the Association’s Individuals; subject to the right of any Party to seek a review of the Panel’s decision pursuant to the rules of the Sport Dispute Resolution Centre of Canada (SDRCC).

No action or legal proceeding will be commenced against the Association or Individuals in respect of a dispute, unless the Association has refused or failed to provide or abide by the dispute resolution process and/or appeal process as set out in the Association’s governing documents.

 


Download the Appeals Policy PDF

Code of Conduct & Ethics — Conditionally Approved

DEFINITIONS

The following terms have these meanings in this Code:

  • “Individuals” – Individuals employed by, or engaged in activities with, the CPSABC including but not limited to, employees, independent contractors, athletes, coaches, officials, performance partners/sport assistants, volunteers, managers, administrators, committee members, parents and guardians at events, and directors and officers of the CPSABC.
  • “Workplace” – Any place where business or work-related activities are conducted. Workplaces include but are not limited to, the CPSABC offices, work-related social functions, work assignments outside the CPSABC offices, work-related travel, the training and competition environment, and work-related conferences or training sessions.
  • “Abuse” – As defined in the CPSABC Abuse Policy, if applicable.
  • “Discrimination” – Differential treatment of an individual based on one or more prohibited grounds which include race, citizenship, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, marital status, family status, genetic characteristics, or disability.
  • “Harassment” – A course of vexatious comment or conduct against an individual or group, which is known or ought to reasonably be known to be unwelcome. Types of behaviour that constitute Harassment include, but are not limited to:
    • Written or verbal abuse, threats, or outbursts
    • Unwelcome remarks, jokes, comments, innuendo, or taunts
    • Racial harassment, which is racial slurs, jokes, name calling, or insulting behaviour or terminology that reinforces stereotypes or discounts abilities because of racial or ethnic origin
    • Leering or other suggestive or obscene gestures
    • Condescending or patronizing behaviour which is intended to undermine self-esteem, diminish performance or adversely affect working conditions
    • Practical jokes which endanger a person’s safety, or may negatively affect performance
    • Hazing, which is any form of conduct which exhibits any potentially humiliating, degrading, abusive, or dangerous activity expected of a junior-ranking individual by a more senior individual, which does not contribute to either individual’s positive development, but is required to be accepted as part of a team or group, regardless of the junior-ranking individual’s willingness to participate. This includes, but is not limited to, any activity, no matter how traditional or seemingly benign, that sets apart or alienates any teammate or group member based on class, number of years on the team or with the group, or ability
    • Unwanted physical contact including, but not limited to, touching, petting, pinching, or kissing
    • Deliberately excluding or socially isolating a person from a group or team
    • Sexual flirtations, advances, requests, or invitations
    • Physical or sexual assault
    • Behaviours such as those described above that are not directed towards a specific person or group but have the same effect of creating a negative or hostile environment
    • Retaliation or threats of retaliation against a person who reports harassment to the CPSABC
  • “Workplace Harassment” – Vexatious comment or conduct against a worker in a Workplace that is known or ought reasonably to be known to be unwelcome. Workplace Harassment should not be confused with legitimate, reasonable management actions that are part of the normal work/training function, including measures to correct performance deficiencies, such as placing someone on a performance improvement plan, or imposing discipline for workplace infractions. Types of behaviour that constitute Workplace Harassment include, but are not limited to:
    • Bullying
    • Workplace pranks, vandalism, bullying or hazing
    • Repeated offensive or intimidating phone calls or emails
    • Inappropriate sexual touching, advances, suggestions or requests
    • Displaying or circulating offensive pictures, photographs or materials in printed or electronic form
    • Psychological abuse
    • Excluding or ignoring someone, including exclusion of a person from work-related social gatherings
    • Deliberately withholding information that would enable a person to do his or her job, perform or train
    • Sabotaging someone else’s work or performance
    • Gossiping or spreading malicious rumours
    • Intimidating words or conduct (offensive jokes or innuendos)
    • Words or actions which are known or should reasonably be known to be offensive, embarrassing, humiliating, or demeaning
  • “Sexual Harassment” – A course of vexatious comment or conduct against an individual because of sex, sexual orientation, gender identify or gender expression, where the course of comment or conduct is known or ought reasonably to be known to be unwelcome; or making a sexual solicitation or advance where the person making the solicitation or advance is in a position to confer, grant or deny a benefit or advance to the individual and the person knows or ought reasonably to know that the solicitation or advance is unwelcome. Types of behaviour that constitute Sexual Harassment include, but are not limited to:
    • Sexist jokes
    • Threats, punishment, or denial of a benefit for refusing a sexual advance
    • Offering a benefit in exchange for a sexual favour
    • Demanding hugs
    • Bragging about sexual ability
    • Leering (sexual staring)
    • Sexual assault
    • Display of sexually offensive material
    • Distributing sexually explicit messages or attachments such as pictures or video files
    • Sexually degrading words used to describe an individual
    • Unwelcome inquiries into or comments about an individual’s gender identity or physical appearance
    • Inquiries or comments about an individual’s sex life
    • Unwanted attention after a consensual relationship ends
    • Unwelcome sexual flirtations, advances, or propositions
    • Unwanted contact
  • “Workplace Violence” – The use of or threat of physical force by a person against a worker in a Workplace that causes or could cause physical injury to the worker; an attempt to exercise physical force against a worker in a Workplace that could cause physical injury to the worker; or a statement or behaviour that it is reasonable for a worker to interpret as a threat to exercise physical force against the worker in a Workplace that could cause physical injury to the worker. Types of behaviour that constitute Workplace Violence include, but are not limited to:
    • Verbal or written threats to attack
    • Sending to or leaving threatening notes or emails
    • Physically threatening behaviour such as shaking a fist at someone, finger pointing, destroying property, or throwing objects
    • Wielding a weapon in a Workplace
    • Hitting, pinching or unwanted touching which is not accidental
    • Dangerous or threatening horseplay
    • Physical restraint or confinement
    • Blatant or intentional disregard for the safety or well-being of others
    • Blocking normal movement or physical interference, with or without the use of equipment
    • Sexual violence
    • Any attempt to engage in the type of conduct outlined above


PURPOSE

The purpose of this Code is to ensure a safe and positive environment (within the CPSABC programs, activities, and events) by making individuals aware that there is an expectation, at all times, of appropriate behaviour consistent with the CPSABC core values. The CPSABC supports equal opportunity, prohibits discriminatory practices, and is committed to providing an environment in which all individuals are treated with respect and fairness.

 

APPLICATIONS OF THIS CODE

This Code applies to individuals’ conduct during the CPSABC business, activities, and events including, but not limited to, competitions, practices, tryouts, training camps, travel associated with the CPSABC activities, the CPSABC office environment, and any meetings.

An individual who violates this Code may be subject to sanctions pursuant to the CPSABC Discipline and Complaints Policy. In addition to facing possible sanction pursuant to the CPSABC Discipline and Complaints Policy, an individual who violates this Code during a competition may be ejected from the competition or the playing area, the official may delay the competition until the individual complies with the ejection, and the individual may be subject to any additional discipline associated with the competition.

An employee of the CPSABC found to have engaged in acts of violence or harassment against any other employee, worker, contractor, member, customer, supplier, client or other third party during business hours, or at any event of the CPSABC , will be subject to appropriate disciplinary action subject to the terms of the CPSABC Human Resources Policy as well as the employee’s Employment Agreement.

This Code also applies to individuals’ conduct outside of the CPSABC business, activities, and events when such conduct adversely affects relationships within the CPSABC (and its work and sport environment) and is detrimental to the image and reputation of the CPSABC . Such applicability will be determined by the CPSABC at its sole discretion.

RESPONSIBILITIES

Individuals

Individuals have a responsibility to:

  • Maintain and enhance the dignity and self-esteem of the CPSABC members and other individuals by:
    • Treating each other with the highest standards of respect and integrity
    • Focusing comments or criticism appropriately and avoiding public criticism of athletes, coaches, officials, organizers, volunteers, employees, or members
    • Consistently demonstrating the spirit of sportsmanship, sport leadership, and ethical conduct
    • Acting, when appropriate, to correct or prevent practices that are unjustly discriminatory
    • Consistently treating individuals fairly and reasonably
    • Ensuring adherence to the rules of the sport and the spirit of those rules
  • Refrain from any behaviour that constitutes Harassment, Workplace Harassment, Sexual Harassment, Workplace Violence, Abuse, or Discrimination
  • Abstain from the non-medical use of drugs or the use of performance-enhancing drugs or methods. More specifically, the CPSABC adopts and adheres to the Canadian Anti-Doping Program. Any infraction under this Program shall be considered an infraction of this Code and may be subject to further disciplinary action, and possible sanction, pursuant to the CPSABC Discipline and Complaints Policy. The CPSABC will respect any penalty enacted pursuant to a breach of the Canadian Anti-Doping Program, whether imposed by the CPSABC or any other sport organization
  • Refrain from associating with any person for the purpose of coaching, training, competition, instruction, administration, management, athletic development, or supervision of the sport, who has incurred an anti-doping rule violation and is serving a sanction involving a period of ineligibility imposed pursuant to the Canadian Anti-Doping Program and/or the World Anti-Doping Code and recognized by the Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport (CCES)
  • Refrain from the use of power or authority in an attempt to coerce another person to engage in inappropriate activities
  • Refrain from consuming tobacco products, or recreational drugs around athletes while participating in the CPSABC programs, activities, competitions, or events
  • In the case of minors, not consume alcohol, tobacco, or cannabis at any competition or event
  • In the case of adults, not consume cannabis in the Workplace or in any situation associated with the CPSABC events (subject to any requirements for accommodation), not consume alcohol during competitions and in situations where minors are present, and take reasonable steps to manage the responsible consumption of alcohol in adult-oriented social situations associated with the CPSABC events
  • Respect the property of others and not wilfully cause damage
  • Promote the sport in the most constructive and positive manner possible
  • When driving a vehicle with an individual:
    • Not have his or her license suspended
    • Not be under the influence of alcohol or illegal drugs or substances
    • Have valid car insurance
    • Not use a mobile device with his or her hands
    • Refrain from engaging in deliberate cheating which is intended to manipulate the outcome of a competition and/or not offer or receive any bribe which is intended to manipulate the outcome of a competition
  • Comply, at all times, with the CPSABC bylaws, policies, procedures, and rules and regulations, as adopted and amended from time to time

 

Directors, Committee Members, and Staff

In addition to section 7 (above), the CPSABC directors, committee members, and staff will have additional responsibilities to:

  • Function primarily as a director or committee member or staff member of the CPSABC ; not as a member of any other member or constituency
  • Act with honesty and integrity and conduct themselves in a manner consistent with the nature and responsibilities of the CPSABC business and the maintenance of individuals’ confidence
  • Ensure that the CPSABC financial affairs are conducted in a responsible and transparent manner with due regard for all fiduciary responsibilities
  • Conduct themselves transparently, professionally, lawfully and in good faith in the best interests of the CPSABC
  • Be independent, impartial, and not be influenced by self-interest, outside pressure, expectation of reward, or fear of criticism
  • Behave with decorum appropriate to both circumstance and position
  • Keep informed about the CPSABC activities, the sport community, and general trends in the sectors in which it operates
  • Exercise the degree of care, diligence, and skill required in the performance of their duties pursuant to the laws under which the CPSABC is incorporated
  • Respect the confidentiality appropriate to issues of a sensitive nature
  • Respect the decisions of the majority and resign if unable to do so
  • Commit the time to attend meetings and be diligent in preparation for, and participation in, discussions at such meetings
  • Have a thorough knowledge and understanding of all the CPSABC governing documents
  • Conform to the bylaws and policies approved by the CPSABC

 

Coaches

In addition to section 7 (above), coaches have many additional responsibilities. The coach-athlete relationship is a privileged one and plays a critical role in the personal, sport, and athletic development of the athlete. Coaches must understand and respect the inherent power imbalance that exists in this relationship and must be extremely careful not to abuse it, consciously or unconsciously. Coaches will:

  • Ensure a safe environment by selecting activities and establishing controls that are suitable for the age, experience, ability, and fitness level of the involved athletes
  • Prepare athletes systematically and progressively, using appropriate time frames and monitoring physical and psychological adjustments while refraining from using training methods or techniques that may harm athletes
  • Avoid compromising the present and future health of athletes by communicating and cooperating with sport medicine professionals in the diagnosis, treatment, and management of athletes’ medical and psychological treatments
  • Support the coaching staff of a training camp, provincial team, or national team; should an athlete qualify for participation with one of these programs
  • Accept and promote athletes’ personal goals and refer athletes to other coaches and sports specialists as appropriate
  • Provide athletes (and the parents/guardians of minor athletes) with the information necessary to be involved in the decisions that affect the athlete
  • Act in the best interest of the athlete’s development as a whole person
  • Comply with the CPSABC Screening Policy, if applicable
  • Report to the CPSABC any ongoing criminal investigation, conviction, or existing bail conditions, including those for violence, child pornography, or possession, use, or sale of any illegal substance
  • Under no circumstances provide, promote, or condone the use of drugs (other than properly prescribed medications) or performance-enhancing substances and, in the case of minors, alcohol, cannabis, and/or tobacco
  • Respect athletes playing with other teams and, in dealings with them, not encroach upon topics or actions which are deemed to be within the realm of coaching, unless after first receiving approval from the coaches who are responsible for the athletes
  • Not engage in a sexual relationship with an athlete under the age of majority
  • Disclose any sexual or intimate relationship with an athlete over the age of majority to the CPSABC and immediately discontinue any coaching involvement with that athlete
  • Recognize the power inherent in the position of coach and respect and promote the rights of all participants in sport. This is accomplished by establishing and following procedures for confidentiality (right to privacy), informed participation, and fair and reasonable treatment. Coaches have a special responsibility to respect and promote the rights of participants who are in a vulnerable or dependent position and less able to protect their own rights
  • Dress professionally, neatly, and inoffensively
  • Use inoffensive language, taking into account the audience being addressed
  • Adhere to Team Member Agreement

 

Athletes

In addition to section 7 (above), athletes will have additional responsibilities to:

  • Report any medical problems in a timely fashion, when such problems may limit their ability to travel, practice, or compete
  • Participate and appear on-time and prepared to participate to their best abilities in all competitions, practices, training sessions, tryouts, tournaments, and events
  • Properly represent themselves and not attempt to participate in a competition for which they are not eligible by reason of age, classification, or other reason
  • Adhere to the CPSABC rules and requirements regarding clothing and equipment
  • Act in a honourable manner and not display appearances of violence, foul language, or gestures to other athletes, officials, coaches, or spectators
  • Dress to represent the sport and themselves well and with professionalism
  • Act in accordance with the CPSABC policies and procedures and, when applicable, additional rules as outlined by coaches or managers
  • Adhere to the National Sport Organization Athlete Agreement

 

Officials

In addition to section 7 (above), officials will have additional responsibilities to:

  • Maintain and update their knowledge of the rules and rules changes
  • Work within the boundaries of their position’s description while supporting the work of other officials
  • Act as an ambassador of the CPSABC by agreeing to enforce and abide by national and provincial rules and regulations
  • Take ownership of actions and decisions made while officiating
  • Respect the rights, dignity, and worth of all individuals
  • Act openly, impartially, professionally, lawfully, and in good faith
  • Be fair, equitable, considerate, independent, honest, and impartial in all dealings with others
  • Respect the confidentiality required by issues of a sensitive nature, which may include ejections, defaults, forfeits, discipline processes, appeals, and specific information or data about individuals
  • Honour all assignments unless unable to do so by virtue of illness or personal emergency, and in these cases inform the assignor or association at the earliest possible time
  • When writing reports, set out the actual facts
  • Dress in proper attire for officiating
  • Comply with the CPSABC Screening Policy

 

Parents/Guardians

In addition to section 7 (above), parents/guardians at events will:

  • Encourage athletes to compete within the rules and to resolve conflicts without resorting to hostility or violence
  • Condemn the use of violence in any form
  • Never ridicule a participant for making a mistake during a performance or practice
  • Provide positive comments that motivate and encourage participants’ continued effort
  • Respect the decisions and judgments of officials, and encourage athletes to do the same
  • Never question an official’s or staff member’s judgment or honesty
  • Support all efforts to remove verbal and physical abuse, coercion, intimidation, and sarcasm
  • Respect and show appreciation to all competitors, and to the coaches, officials and other volunteers
  • Not harass competitors, coaches, officials, parents/guardians, or other spectators

 

CPSABC (SportAbility) accepts all language contained in the British Columbia Universal Code of Conduct (BC UCC). A copy of the code is hosted here.


Download the Code of Conduct & Ethics Policy PDF

Discipline and complaints policy — Conditionally Approved

DEFINITIONS

The following terms have these meanings in this Policy:

  • “Association” – Cerebral Palsy Sports Association of British Columbia.
  • “Case Manager” – An individual appointed by the Association, who need not be a member or affiliated with the Association, to administer this Discipline and Complaints Policy. The Case Manager will comply with the position description described in Appendix “A”
  • “Complainant” – The Party alleging an infraction.
  • “Days” – Days including weekends and holidays.
  • “Individuals” – All categories of membership defined in the Association’s Bylaws, as well as all individuals employed by or engaged in activities with the Association including, but not limited to, athletes, coaches, support persons, convenors, referees, officials, volunteers, managers, administrators, committee members, and directors and officers of the Association.
  • “In writing”- A letter, fax or email sent directly to the Association.
  • “Respondent” – The alleged infracting Party

 

PURPOSE

Individuals and participants are expected to fulfill certain responsibilities and obligations including, but not limited to, complying with Association’s policies, bylaws, rules and regulations, and Codes of Conduct. Non-compliance may result in discipline pursuant to this Policy.

 

APPLICATIONS OF THIS POLICY

  • This Policy applies to all Individuals relating to matters that may arise during the course of Association’s business, activities, and events including, but not limited to, competitions, practices, tryouts, training camps, travel associated with Association activities, and any meetings.
  • This Policies also applies to Individuals’ conduct outside of the Association’s business, activities, and events when such conduct adversely affects relationships within the Association (its work and/or sport environment) or is detrimental to the image and reputation of the Association. The jurisdiction of this Policy will be determined by the Association at its sole discretion.
  • This Policy does not prevent immediate discipline from being applied as reasonably required. Further discipline may be applied according to this Policy. Any infractions or complaints occurring within competition will be dealt with by the procedures specific to the competition, if applicable. In such situations, disciplinary measures will be for the duration of the competition, training, activity or event only.
  • An employee of the Association found to have to be a Respondent will be subject to appropriate disciplinary action subject to the terms of the Association’s Employee Policies, as well as the employee’s Employment Agreement, as applicable. Violations may result in a warning, reprimand, restrictions, suspension or other disciplinary actions up to and including termination of employment.

 

REPORTING A COMPLAINT

  • Any Individual may report any complaint to the Association. A complaint must be In Writing and must be filed within 14 days of the alleged incident.
  • A Complainant wishing to file a complaint outside of the 14 days must provide a written statement giving reasons for an exemption to this limitation. The decision to accept or deny the complaint outside of the 14 days will be at the sole discretion of the Case Manager. This decision may not be appealed.
  • At the Association’s discretion, the Association may act as the complainant and initiate the complaint process under the terms of this Policy. In such cases, the Association will identify an individual to represent the Association.
  • Resignation or lapsing of membership after a complaint is filed does not preclude disciplinary proceedings being pursued under this policy.

 

CASE MANAGER

  • Upon the receipt of a complaint, the Association will appoint an independent Case Manager to manage and administer complaints submitted in accordance with this Policy and such appointment is not appealable.
  • The Case Manager has a responsibility to:
    • Determine whether the complaint is frivolous or within the jurisdiction of this Policy
    • Propose the use of the Association’s Alternate Dispute Resolution Policy
    • Appoint the Panel, if necessary
    • Coordinate all administrative aspects and set timelines
    • Provide administrative assistance and logistical support to the Panel as required
    • Provide any other service or support that may be necessary to ensure a fair and timely proceeding

PROCEDURES

  • If the Case Manager determines the complaint is:
    • Frivolous or outside the jurisdiction of this Policy, the complaint will be dismissed immediately an individual will be notified immediately.
    • Not frivolous and within the jurisdiction of this Policy, the Case Manager will notify the Parties the complaint is accepted and the applicable next steps.
  • The Case Manager’s decision to accept or dismiss the complaint may not be appealed.
  • The Case Manager will establish and adhere to timeframes that ensure procedural fairness and that the matter is heard in a timely fashion.
  • After notifying the Parties that the complaint has been accepted, the Case Manager will first, propose the Association’s Alternate Dispute Resolution Policy with the objective of resolving the dispute. If the dispute is not resolved or the parties refuse the Alternate Dispute Resolution Policy, the Case Manager will appoint a Discipline Panel, which shall consist of a single Adjudicator, to hear the complaint. In extraordinary circumstances, and at the discretion of the Case Manager, a Panel of three persons may be appointed to hear the complaint. In this event, the Case Manager will appoint one of the Panel’s members to serve as the Chair.
  • The Case Manager, in cooperation with the Discipline Panel, will then decide the format under which the complaint will be heard. This decision may not be appealed. The format of the hearing, may involve direct communications with the Parties, an oral in-person hearing, an oral hearing by telephone or other telecommunications, a hearing based on a review of documentary evidence submitted in advance of the hearing, or a combination of these methods. The Case Manager, in cooperation with the Discipline Panel will make every reasonable effort to accommodate accessibility needs when determining the format of the hearing. The hearing will be governed by the procedures that the Case Manager and the Discipline Panel deem appropriate in the circumstances, provided that:
    • The Parties will be given appropriate notice of the day, time, and place of the hearing, in the case of an oral in-person hearing, an oral hearing by telephone or other telecommunications
    • Copies of any written documents which the parties wish to have the Panel consider will be provided to all Parties, through the Case Manager, in advance of the hearing and/or decision rendered
    • The Parties may be accompanied by a representative, advisor, or legal counsel at their own expense
    • The Discipline Panel may request that any other individual participate and give evidence at the hearing
    • The Discipline Panel may allow as evidence at the hearing any oral evidence and document or thing relevant to the subject matter of the complaint, but may exclude such evidence that is unduly repetitious and shall place such weight on the evidence as it deems appropriate
    • The decision will be by a majority vote of the Discipline Panel
  • If the Respondent acknowledges the facts of the incident, the Respondent may waive the hearing, in which case the Discipline Panel will determine the appropriate disciplinary action. The Discipline Panel may still hold a hearing for the purpose of determining an appropriate disciplinary measure(s).
  • The hearing will proceed in any event, even if a Party chooses not to participate in the hearing.
  • If a decision affects a 3rd party to the extent that the 3rd party would have recourse to a complaint or an appeal in their own right, that 3rd party will become a party and apart of the complaint procedure to the complaint in question and will be bound by the decision.
  • In fulfilling its duties, the Panel may obtain independent advice.

 

DECISION

After hearing and/or reviewing the matter, the Discipline Panel will determine whether an infraction has occurred and, if so, the discipline to be imposed. Within fourteen (14) days of the hearing’s conclusion, the Discipline Panel’s written decision, with reasons, will be distributed to all Parties, the Case Manager, and the Association. In extraordinary circumstances, the Discipline Panel may first issue a verbal or summary decision soon after the hearing’s conclusion, with the full written decision to be issued before the end of the fourteen (14) day period. The decision will be considered a matter of public record unless decided otherwise by the Discipline Panel.

 

DISCIPLINE

  • The Panel may apply the following disciplinary measures, singularly or in combination:
    • Verbal or written reprimand
    • Verbal or written apology
    • Service or other contribution to the Association
    • Removal of certain privileges
    • Suspension from certain teams, events, and/or activities
    • Suspension from all Association activities for a designated period of time
    • Withholding of prize money or awards
    • Payment of the cost of repairs for property damage
    • Suspension of funding from the Association or from other sources
    • Expulsion from the Association
    • Any other disciplinary measure considered appropriate for the offense
  • Unless the Discipline Panel decides otherwise, any discipline measures will begin immediately, notwithstanding an appeal. Failure to comply with a decision as determined by the Discipline Panel will result in automatic suspension until such time as compliance occurs.
  • Infractions that result in discipline will be recorded and records will be maintained by the Association.

 

SUSPENSION PENDING A HEARING

The Association may determine that an alleged incident is of such seriousness as to warrant suspension of an Individual pending completion of the criminal process, a hearing or a decision of the Panel.

 

CRIMINAL CONVICTIONS

An Individual’s conviction for a Criminal Code offense, as determined by the Association, will be deemed an infraction under this Policy and will result in expulsion from the Association. Criminal Code offences may include, but are not limited to:

  • Any child pornography offences
  • Any sexual offences
  • Any offence of physical violence
  • Any offence of assault
  • Any offence involving trafficking of illegal drugs

 

CONFIDENTIALITY

The discipline and complaints process is confidential and involves only the Parties, the Case Manager, the Discipline Panel, and any independent advisors to the Panel. Once initiated and until a decision is released, none of the Parties will disclose confidential information relating to the discipline or complaint to any person not involved in the proceedings.

 

TIMELINES

If the circumstances of the complaint are such that adhering to the timelines outlined by this Policy will not allow a timely resolution to the complaint, the Discipline Panel may direct that these timelines be revised.

 

RECORDS AND DISTRIBUTION OF DECISIONS

Other individuals or organizations, including but not limited to, national sport organizations, provincial partners, stakeholders, etc., may be advised of any decisions rendered in accordance with this Policy.

 

APPEALS PROCEDURE

The decision of the Panel may be appealed in accordance with the Association’s Appeal Policy.

APPENDIX A: CASE MANAGER POSITION DESCRIPTION

Purpose

In some of its policies, the Association requires the appointment of a Case Manager. This Position Description outlines the role, identity, responsibilities and tasks of the Case Manager.

Policies

The following Policies require the appointment of a Case Manager:

  • Discipline and Complaints
  • Appeal
  • Alternate Dispute Resolution Policy

Identity

The Case Manager, whether or not appointed by the Association at its sole discretion, should be experienced with the management of disputes in an unbiased manner. The individual should not be connected in any way to the issue being disputed (and/or the outcome of the dispute) but does not necessarily need to be an independent third-party not connected with the Association – though the guaranteed independence and neutrality of a third-party is preferred. The individual does not need to be a Member of the Association.

The Case Manager’s identity does not need to be approved by any of the parties involved in the dispute, excluding the Association.

 

Discretion – Complaints

When a complaint is filed, the Case Manager is required to:

  • Determine whether the complaint is frivolous and within the jurisdiction of the Discipline and Complaints Policy
  • Propose the use of the Association’s Alternate Dispute Resolution Policy
  • Appoint the Panel, if necessary
  • Coordinate all administrative aspects and set timelines
  • Provide administrative assistance and logistical support to the Panel as required
  • Provide any other service or support that may be necessary to ensure a fair and timely proceeding

 

Discretion – Appeals

When an appeal is filed, the Case Manager is required to:

  • Propose the use of the Association’s Alternate Dispute Resolution Policy
  • Determine if the appeal falls under the scope of the Appeal Policy
  • Determine if the appeal was submitted in a timely manner
  • Decide whether there are sufficient grounds for the appeal
  • Appoint the Panel, if necessary
  • Coordinate all administrative aspects and set timelines
  • Provide administrative assistance and logistical support to the Panel as required
  • Provide any other service or support that may be necessary to ensure a fair and timely proceeding

 

When determining if there are sufficient grounds for appeal, the Case Manager is not acting as the Panel and determining the merits of the appeal, but instead determining whether the Appellant has properly shown that an error, as described in the Appeal Policy, has been properly argued. The Case Manager will need to carefully consult the Association’s policies and procedures, and analyze the process that contributed to the decision, to determine whether there are appropriate grounds.

 

Discretion – Alternate Dispute Resolution

When the parties agree to the jurisdiction of the Alternate Dispute Resolution Policy, the Case Manager may be required to:

  • Appoint the mediator or facilitator
  • Coordinate all administrative aspects and set timelines
  • Provide administrative assistance and logistical support to the mediator or facilitator as required

 

Hearing Format – Discretion

If necessary, the Case Manager is required to exercise their discretion to determine the format of the hearing. Hearings typically take the following forms, but are not limited to:

  • In person
  • Conference call
  • Written submissions
  • Conference call plus written submissions

In determining the format of the hearing the Case Manager should consider:

  • The distance between the parties
  • The animosity between the parties
  • The time commitment and location of the Panel
  • The timelines for a decision
  • The language barriers between the parties
  • The gravity of the complaint/appeal
  • Every reasonable effort to accommodate accessibility needs

Panel Appointment

The Case Manager is required to appoint a Panel of one person, or three in extraordinary circumstances, to decide the issue.

 

The Case Manager should remind the Panel to adhere to the powers given to the Panel by the applicable policy. For example, if the policy does not permit the Panel to suspend the respondent indefinitely, then the Panel cannot sanction the respondent in this manner.

Communication

Especially when the hearing is to be held by written submissions, the Case Manager is required to communicate swiftly, clearly, and decisively with each party. The parties must adhere to the deadlines set by the Case Manager or by the applicable policy and the process must move forward even if a party misses a deadline.

When coordinating an oral hearing, the Case Manager should first consider the schedule of the Panel, then the schedule of the complainant, and then the schedule of the respondent in an attempt to find a suitable time for everyone.

Suggested Procedure

The Case Manager may implement the following procedure to facilitate the Discipline and Complaints Policy or the Appeal Policy:

  • Receive the written complaint or appeal
  • Communicate with the Complainant/Appellant that you have been appointed the Case Manager and that their complaint/appeal will be disclosed to the Respondent and Panel. Also determine if there is additional evidence or written submissions to follow, if so, provide a deadline for receipt. (After this step, the Complainant/Appellant may not have another opportunity to make additional submissions or provide evidence, unless determined otherwise by the Panel)
  • Determine whether the complaint is within the jurisdiction of the applicable Policy.
  • Notify the Respondent that you are the Case Manager and are in receipt of a complaint/appeal. Communicate to the Respondent that any submissions will be provided to the Complainant/Appellant and Panel. Provide the Respondent with a reasonable timeframe to submit their response document and any applicable evidence. (After this step, the Respondent may not have another opportunity to make additional submissions or provide evidence, unless determined otherwise by the Panel).
  • The Case Manager may wish to provide the Complainant/Appellant to submit a rebuttal, but the rebuttal must be limited to issues raised by the Respondent and is not an opportunity to provide new evidence. The Panel may exclude such new evidence.
  • Appoint the Panel
  • Conduct a hearing either via written documentation, teleconference, in – person, or a combination of these techniques.
  • Ensure the Panel renders a written decision within a prescribed timeline


Download the Discipline & Complaints Policy PDF

 

Event Discipline Procedure — Conditionally Approved

** This Event Discipline Procedure does not supersede or replace the CPSABC’s Discipline and Complaints Policy **

DEFINITIONS

The following terms have these meanings in this Policy:

  • “Association” – Cerebral Palsy Sports Association of British Columbia.
  • “CPSABC” – Cerebral Palsy Sports Association of British Columbia
  • “Event” – An CPSABC- sanctioned event or National event attended by CPSABC Individuals
  • “Individuals” – All categories of membership defined in the Association’s Bylaws, as well as all individuals employed by or engaged in activities with the Association including, but not limited to, athletes, coaches, support persons, convenors, officials, volunteers, managers, administrators, committee members, and directors and officers of the Association.

PURPOSE

The Association is committed to providing a competition environment in which all Individuals are treated with respect. This Procedure outlines how misconduct during an Event will be handled.

 

SCOPE AND APPLICATION OF THIS POLICY

This Procedure will be applied to all the CPSABC-sanctioned Events and International events attended by CPSABC Individuals.

 

This Procedure does not replace or supersede the CPSABC’s  Discipline and  Complaints  Policy.  Instead, this  Procedure works  in concert with the Discipline and Complaints Policy by outlining, for a designated person with authority at an CPSABC-sanctioned event, the procedure for taking immediate, informal, or corrective action in the event of a possible violation of the CPSABC’s Code of Conduct and Ethics.

 

MISCONDUCT DURING EVENTS

  • Incidents that violate or potentially violate the CPSABC’s Code of Conduct and Ethics, which can occur during a competition, away from the area of competition, or between parties connected to the Event, shall be reported to a designated person (usually the head official or on-site convenor) responsible at the Event.
  • The CPSABC designated person at the Event shall use the following procedure to address the incident that violated or potentially violated the CPSABC’s Code of Conduct and Ethics:
    • Notify the involved parties that there has been an incident that violated or potentially violated the CPSABC’s Code of Conduct and Ethics
    • Convene a panel of either one person or three people (one of whom shall be designated the Chairperson), who shall not be in a conflict of interest or involved in the original incident, to determine whether the CPSABC’s Code of Conduct and Ethics has  been violated. The designated person at the Event may serve on the panel
    • The panel will interview and secure statements from any witnesses to the alleged violation
    • If the violation occurred during a competition, interviews will be held with the officials who officiated or observed the competition and with the coaches and captains of each team when necessary and appropriate
    • The panel will secure a statement from the person(s) accused of the violation
    • The panel will render a decision and determine a possible penalty if warranted
    • The Chairperson of the panel will inform all parties of the panel’s decision
  • The penalty determined by the panel may include any of the following, singularly or in combination:
    • Oral or written warning
    • Oral or written reprimand
    • Suspension from future competitions at the Event
    • Ejection from the Event
    • Other appropriate penalty as determined by the panel
  • The panel does not have the authority to determine a penalty that exceeds the duration of the Event. A full written report of the incident and the panel’s decision shall be submitted to the CPSABC following the conclusion of the Event. Further discipline may  then be applied per the CPSABC’s Discipline and Complaints Policy if necessary.
  • This Procedure does not prohibit other Individuals from reporting the same incident to the CPSABC to be addressed as a  formal complaint under the CPSABC’s Discipline and Complaints Policy.
  • The CPSABC will record and track all reported incidents.

 


Download the Event Discipline Procedure PDF

Extended Stay Travel Policy — Conditionally Approved
Subject to the permission of the Head Coach or designate (i.e. Team Manager), athletes who are of the age of majority (19 years and older) are permitted to remain behind after the competition is over. These athletes must give CPSABC assurances that their personal safety will not be at risk while traveling alone.

Subject to the permission of the Head Coach or designate (i.e. Team Manager) athletes who are under the age of majority (18 years) are permitted to remain behind after the competition is over, but must also have the permission of their guardian/parent. In addition, they must assure CPSABC that they will be under the supervision of a guardian/parent for the remainder of their stay.

All athletes, who remain behind after the competition is over, must officially notify the Head Coach or designate at the point of leaving the Team. Once an athlete has officially notified and left the Team, they will be responsible for all their expenses. This includes, but may not be limited to, accommodations, meals, personal travel, equipment damages and insurance.

Staff including coaches, performance partners, medical, chaperones, and Team Managers, are permitted to remain behind after the competition has ended if granted permission from the Head Coach or designate. The Head Coach or designate will make their decision based upon the fact CPSABC has a commitment to the athletes to provide support while traveling to and from competitions. It is the primary responsibility of all staff of CPSABC to ensure that all athletes are always provided with the highest possible standard of support, this includes team travel.


Download the Extended Stay Travel Policy PDF

Family and Friends Policy — Conditionally Approved
Family and friends are encouraged to attend competitions to show their support and are considered a vital part of the athlete’s network.

However, family and friends are not official team members unless they have been selected for a team position.

Therefore, family members and friends attending competitions as spectators are responsible for making their own travel, meals and accommodation arrangements for said competitions and cannot stay in the team accommodations or in the room of a team member. Requests to contrary to share accommodation will be considered on a case by case basis by the Head Coach.

Family and friends attending as spectators will have access to the public spectator areas only. Therefore, athletes will need to come to the public spectator areas to connect with family and friends.

All athletes selected to represent the CPSABC are expected to travel to competitions together.


Download the Family and Friends Policy PDF

Performance Partner Policy — Conditionally Approved
Provincial Team Boccia athletes are eligible to name a maximum of one performance partner per event. Athletes are encouraged to make every effort to travel and train with the same performance partner.

Performance partners must be:

  • 18 years or older
  • Complete a background record check
  • Sign a Provincial Sport Organization Athlete Agreement (Boccia Provincial Team Member Agreement)
  • Read and adhere to CPSABC policies
  • Be familiar with and able to complete all necessary personal and sport routines for the athlete under travel conditions

 

Requests to travel with more than one performance partner will be considered by the Head Coach on a case by case basis. Requests to travel with an additional performance partner must include:

  • a detailed plan outlining the duties for each performance partner
  • a transition plan identifying when and how the athlete will achieve readiness to travel with one performance partner

If approved, the additional performance partner will travel at their own expense. The additional performance partner is permitted to register with the team and room with the athlete. Where this is not feasible, the Head Coach and staff will work with the athlete and performance partner(s) to determine the best approach.

 


Download the Performance Partner Policy PDF

Screening Policy — Conditionally Approved

DEFINITIONS

The following terms have these meanings in this Policy:

 

  • “Criminal Record Check (CRC)” – A search of the RCMP Canadian Police Information Centre (CPIC) system for adult convictions
  • “Local Police Information (LPI)” – Additional conviction and selected non-conviction information in national and local police data sources which may be relevant to the position sought
  • “Enhanced Police Information Check (E-PIC)” – a Criminal Record Check search, plus a search of local police information, available from JAG Criminal Record Check Review Program
  • “Vulnerable Sector Check (VSC)” – A detailed check that includes a search of the RCMP Canadian Police Information Centre (CPIC) system, local police information, and the Pardoned Sex Offender database
  • “Vulnerable Individuals” – A person under the age of 18 years old and/or a person who, because of age, disability or other circumstance, is in a position of dependence on others or is otherwise at a greater risk than the general population of being harmed by people in positions of trust or authority

 

PREAMBLE

The CPSABC understands that screening personnel and volunteers is a vital part of providing a safe sporting environment and has become a common practice among sport organizations that provide programs and services to the community.

 

APPLICATIONS OF THIS POLICY

  1. This Policy applies to all individuals whose position with the CPSABC is one of trust or authority which may relate to, at a minimum, finances, supervision, or Vulnerable Individuals.

 

  1. Not all individuals associated with the CPSABC will be required to obtain a criminal record check or submit screening documents because not all positions pose a risk of harm to the CPSABC or to its participants. The CPSABC will determine which individuals will be subject to screening using the following guidelines (the CPSABC may vary the guidelines at its discretion):

 

Level 1 – Low Risk – Individuals involved in low risk assignments who are not in a supervisory role, not directing others, not involved with finances, not in an one-on-one situation, and/or do not have unsupervised access to Vulnerable Individuals. Examples inlcude:

  1. a)  Parents, youth, or volunteers who are helping out on a non-regular or informal basis
  2. b)  Committee Members

 

Level 2 – Medium Risk – Individuals involved in medium risk assignments who may be in a supervisory role, may direct others, may be involved with finances, and/or who may have limited access to Vulnerable Individuals. Examples include:

  1. a)  Officials (referees, technical delegate)
  2. b)  Host Committee Members
  3. c)   Board of Directors

 

Level 3 – High Risk – Individuals involved in high risk assignments who occupy positions of trust and/or authority, have a supervisory role, direct others, are involved with finances, and who have frequent or unsupervised access to Vulnerable Individuals. Examples include:

  1. a)  Coaches
  2. b)  Integrated Support Team Members/Medical (physiotherapist, biomechanist, mental performance coach, physiologist, nutritionist)
  3. c)   Classifiers
  4. d)  Performance Partners/Sport Assistants
  5. e)  Team Manager travelling with the athletes
  6. f)   Employees of the CPSABC

SCREENING COMMITTEE

  • The implementation of this Policy is the responsibility of the CPSABC Screening Committee which is a committee of either one (1) or three (3) members appointed by the CPSABC, currently identified as the Executive Director. The CPSABC will ensure that the members appointed to the Screening Committee possess the requisite skills, knowledge and abilities to accurately screen documents and render decisions under this Policy.
  • The Screening Committee will carry out its duties, in accordance with the terms of this Policy, independent of the Board.
  • The Screening Committee is responsible for reviewing all documents submitted and, based on the review, making decisions regarding the appropriateness of individuals filling positions within the CPSABC. In carrying out its duties, the Screening Committee should consult with independent experts including lawyers, police, risk management consultants, volunteer screening specialists, or any other person deemed to have the skills or knowledge relevant to the screening process.

 

SCREENING REQUIREMENTS

  1. It is the CPSABC policy that when an individual is first engaged by the CPSABC:
  2. a)   Level 1 individuals will:
  3. Complete an Application Form (volunteers see Appendix A)
  4. Participate in training, orientation, and monitoring as determined by the CPSABC

iii. Read and abide by the CPSABC Code of Conduct and Ethics Policy

  1. Be supervised at all times by a Person of Authority (an individual who has gone through the Level 2 or 3 process)

 

  1. b)   Level 2 individuals will:
  2. Complete an Application Form
  3. Complete a Screening Disclosure Form

iii. Complete and provide an E-PIC

  1. Provide one letter of reference related to the position
  2. Read and abide by the CPSABC Code of Conduct and Ethics Policy
  3. Participate in training, orientation, and monitoring as determined by the CPSABC

vii. Provide a driver’s abstract, if requested

 

  1. c)   Level 3 individuals will:
  2. Complete an Application Form
  3. Complete a Screening Disclosure Form

iii. Complete and provide an E-PIC and a VSC

  1. Provide two letters of reference related to the position
  2. Read and abide by the CPSABC Code of Conduct and Ethics Policy
  3. Participate in training, orientation, and monitoring as determined by the CPSABC

vii. Provide a driver’s abstract, if requested

viii. Complete an interview with the CPSABC

 

  1. d)   If an individual subsequently receives a charge, conviction for, or is found guilty of, an offense they will report this circumstance immediately to the CPSABC. Additionally, the individual will inform the CPSABC of any changes in their circumstance that would alter their original responses in their Screening Disclosure Form.

 

  1. e)   If the CPSABC learns that an individual has provided false, inaccurate, or misleading information, the individual will immediately be removed from their position and may be subject to further discipline in accordance with the CPSABC Discipline and Complaints Policy.

 

YOUNG PEOPLE

  • The CPSABC defines a young person as someone who is younger than 18 years old. When screening young people, the CPSABC will:
    • Not require the young person to obtain a VSC or E-PIC
    • In lieu of obtaining a VSC or E-PIC, require the young person to submit up to two (2) additional letters of reference
  • Notwithstanding the above, the CPSABC may ask a young person to obtain a VSC or E-PIC if the CPSABC suspects the young person has an adult conviction and therefore has a criminal record. In these circumstances, the CPSABC will be clear in its request that it is not asking for the young person’s youth record. The CPSABC understands that it may not request to see a young person’s youth record.

 

RENEWAL

  • Unless the Screening Committee determines, on a case-by-case basis, to modify the submission requirements, individuals who are required to submit an E-PIC, Screening Disclosure Form, VSC, or Screening Renewal Form, are required to submit the documents as follows:
    • An E-PIC every three years
    • A Screening Disclosure Form every three years
    • A Screening Renewal Form (Appendix C) every year
    •  A Vulnerable Sector Check once
  •  The Screening Committee may request that an individual provide any of the above documents at any time. Such request will be made in writing and reasons will be provided for the request.

 

ORIENTATION, TRAINING, AND MONITORING

  • The type and amount of orientation, training, and monitoring will be based on the individual’s level of risk, at the discretion of the CPSABC.
  •  Orientation may include, but is not limited to: introductory presentations, facility tours, equipment demonstrations, parent/athlete meetings, meetings with colleagues and supervisors, orientation manuals, orientation sessions, and increased supervision during initial tasks or initial period of engagement.
  • Training may include, but is not limited to: certification courses, online learning, mentoring, workshop sessions, webinars, on-site demonstrations, and peer feedback.
  • At the conclusion of orientation and training, the individual will be required to acknowledge, in written form, that they have received and completed the orientation and training.
  • Monitoring may include but is not limited to: written or oral reports, observations, tracking, electronic surveillance (e.g., facility security cameras), and site visits.

HOW TO OBTAIN AN E-PIC OR VSC

  • An E-PIC may be obtained online via JAG Criminal Record Check Review Program. Contact the CPSABC office to request the link.
  • In BC, the process for obtaining a Criminal Record Check is different than in other provinces and territories and sections of this Policy relating to obtaining a Criminal Record Check may not apply. In such cases, the Screening Committee will provide individuals with directions pursuant to the following website: https://www.viasport.ca/resource/free-criminal-record-check-procedure
  • Individuals may only obtain a VSC by visiting an RCMP office or police station, submitting two pieces of government-issued identification (one of which must have a photo), and completing any required paperwork. Fees may also be required.
  • Fingerprinting may be required if there is a positive match with the individual’s gender and birth date.
  • The CPSABC understands that it may be required to assist an individual with obtaining a VSC. The CPSABC may need to submit a Request for VSC (Appendix D) or complete other documentation describing the nature of the organization and the individual’s role with vulnerable individuals.

 

PROCEDURE

  • Screening documents must be submitted to the following individual:
    • Executive Director, CPSABC or designated alternate: info@CPSABC.ca;
  •  An individual who refuses or fails to provide the necessary screening documents will be ineligible to volunteer or apply for the position sought. The individual will be informed that their application and/or position will not proceed until such time as the screening documents are submitted.
  • The CPSABC understands that there may be delays in receiving the results of an E-PIC or a VSC. At its discretion, the CPSABC may permit the individual, under supervision, to participate in the role during the delay. The CPSABC may withdraw this permission at any time and for any reason.
  • The CPSABC recognizes that different information will be available depending on the type of screening document that the individual has submitted. For example, an E-PIC may show details of a specific offense, or not, and/or a VSC may be returned with specific information or simply a notification indicating “cleared” or “not cleared”. The Screening Committee will use its expertise and discretion when making decisions based on the screening documents that have been submitted.
  • Following the review of the screening documents, the Screening Committee will decide:
    • The individual has passed screening and may participate in the desired position
    • The individual has passed screening and may participate in the desired position with conditions
    • The individual has not passed screening and may not participate in the desired position
    • More information is required from the individual
  • In making its decision, the Screening Committee will consider the type of offense, date of offense, and relevance of the offense to the position sought.
  • The Screening Committee must decide that an individual has not passed screening if the screening documentation reveals any of the following:
    • Any offense involving the use of a motor vehicle, including but not limited to impaired driving
    • Any offense for trafficking and/or possession of drugs and/or narcotics convicted
    • Any offense involving conduct against public morals
    • Any crime of violence including but not limited to, all forms of assault
    • Any offense involving a minor or minors or vulnerable person defined by law
    • An individual’s conviction for any of the following Criminal Code offenses:
    • Any offense of physical or psychological violence
    • Any crime of violence including but not limited to, all forms of assault
    • Any offense involving trafficking of illegal drugs
    • Any offense involving the possession, distribution, or sale of any child-related pornography
    • Any sexual offense
    • Any offense involving theft or fraud
    • If charged in the last three years for:
    • If charged in the last ten years for:
    • If charged at any time for:

CONDITIONS AND MONITORING

  • Excluding the incidents above which, if revealed, would cause the individual to not pass screening, the Screening Committee may determine that incidents revealed on an individual’s screening documents may allow the individual to pass the screening process and participate in a desired position with conditions imposed. The Screening Committee may apply and remove conditions at its discretion and will determine the means by which adherence to conditions may be monitored.

RECORDS

  • All records will be maintained in a confidential manner and will not be disclosed to others except as required by law, or for use in legal, quasi-legal, or disciplinary proceedings.
  • The records kept by the CPSABC as part of the screening process include but are not limited to:
    • An individual’s Vulnerable Sector Check
    • An individual’s E-PIC (for a period of three years)
    • An individual’s Screening Disclosure Form (for a period of three years)
    • An individual’s Screening Renewal Form (for a period of one year)
    • Records of any conditions attached to an individual’s registration by the Screening Committee
    • Records of any discipline applied to any individual by the CPSABC or by another sport organization


Download the Screening Policy PDF [Including Appendices]

SOCIAL MEDIA GUIDELINES FOR ATHLETES AND COACHES — Conditionally Approved
The Social Media Guidelines for Coaches and Athletes is a separate document from the Social Media Policy.

 

DEFINITIONS

The following term has this meaning in these Guidelines:

  • “Association” – Cerebral Palsy Sports Association of British Columbia 
  • “Social media” – The catch-all term that is applied broadly to new computer-mediated communication media such as blogs, YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, Tumblr, Snapchat, and Twitter

 

PURPOSE

These Guidelines provide coaches and athletes with tips and suggestions for social media use. Coaches and athletes are strongly encouraged to develop their own strategy for social media use (either written down or not) and ensure that their strategy for social media use is acceptable pursuant to the CPSABC’s Code of Conduct and Ethics and Social Media Policy.

Given the nature of social media as a continually developing communication sphere, the CPSABC trusts its coaches and athletes to use their best judgment when interacting with social media. These Guidelines are not hard and fast rules or behavioural laws; but rather recommendations that will inform coaches’ and athletes’ best judgment.

 

SOCIAL MEDIA GUIDELINES FOR COACHES

The following tips should be used by coaches to inform their own strategy for social media use:

  • Choosing not to engage with social media is an acceptable social media strategy. But you must have good reasons for your choice and be active in other communication media
  • Despite what Facebook says, you are not actually “friends” with athletes. Resist commenting on athletes’ personal activities, status updates, or tweets on Twitter
  • Consider monitoring or being generally aware of athletes’ public social media behaviour to ensure compliance with the CPSABC’s
  • Code of Conduct and Ethics and Social Media Policy
  • Coaches may not demand access to an athlete’s private posts on Twitter, Instagram, or Facebook
  • Do not “friend” athletes on Facebook unless they request the connection. Never pressure athletes to “friend” you
  • If you accept some “friend” requests, or follow one athlete on Twitter or Instagram, you should accept all friend requests and follow all the athletes. Be careful not to show favouritism on social media
  • Consider managing your social media so that athletes do not have the option to follow you on Twitter or “friend” you on Facebook
  • Seek permission from athletes before posting pictures or videos of the athletes on publicly available social media like a blog,
  • Instagram, or YouTube
  • Keep selection decisions and other official team business off social media
  • Never require athletes to join Facebook, join a Facebook group, subscribe to a Twitter feed, or join a Facebook page about your team or organization
  • If you create a page on Facebook or Instagram for your team or athlete, do not make this social media site the exclusive location for important information. Duplicate important information in more official channels (like on a website or via email)
  • Ensure that athletes and parents of athletes under the age of 18 are aware that some coach-athlete interactions may take place on social media
  • Exercise appropriate discretion when using social media for your own personal communications (with friends, colleagues, and other athletes) with the knowledge that your behaviour may be used as a model by your athletes
  • Avoid association with Facebook groups, Instagram accounts, or Twitter feeds with explicit sexual content or viewpoints that might offend or compromise the coach-athlete relationship
  • Never misrepresent yourself by using a fake name or fake profile
  • Be aware that you may acquire information about an athlete that imposes an obligation of disclosure on your part (such as seeing pictures of underage athletes drinking during a trip)
  • Attempt to make communication with athletes in social media as one-sided as possible. Be available for athletes if they initiate contact via social media – athletes may wish to have this easy and quick access to you – but avoid imposing yourself into an athlete’s personal social media space unless explicitly requested to do so
  • Avoid adding athletes to Snapchat and do not send snapchats to athletes

 

SOCIAL MEDIA GUIDELINES FOR ATHLETES

The following tips should be used by athletes to inform their own strategy for social media use:

  • Set your privacy settings to restrict who can search for you and what private information other people can see
  • Coaches, teammates, officials, or opposing competitors may all add you to Facebook or follow you on Instagram or Twitter. You are not required to follow anyone or be Facebook friends with anyone
  • Avoid adding coaches to Snapchat and do not send snapchats to coaches
  • If you feel harassed by someone in a social medium, report it to your coach, club official, or to the CPSABC
  • Do not feel pressure to join a fan page on Facebook or follow a Twitter feed or Instagram account
  • Content posted on a social medium, relative to your privacy settings, is considered public. In most cases, you do not have a reasonable expectation of privacy for any material that you post
  • Content posted to a social medium is almost always permanent – consider that other individuals may take screencaps of your content (even snapchats) before you can delete them
  • Avoid posting pictures of, or alluding to, participation in illegal activity such as: speeding, physical assault, harassment, drinking alcohol (if underage), and smoking marijuana (if underage)
  • Model appropriate behaviour in social media befitting your status as a) an elite athlete, and b) a member of your club and of the CPSABC. As a representative of the CPSABC, you have agreed to the CPSABC’s Code of Conduct and Ethics and must follow that Code when you post material and interact with other people through social media
  • Be aware that your public Facebook page, Instagram account, or Twitter feed may be monitored by your coach or by the CPSABC and content or behaviour demonstrated in social media may be subject to sanction under the CPSABC’s Discipline and Complaints Policy

 

ORGANIZATION RESPONSIBILITIES

Organizations should not attempt to impose social media restrictions onto coaches or athletes. There are many situations where social media contact is desirable and necessary; yet many situations where social media contact is unwanted and risky. Coaches and athletes should be trusted, pursuant to the CPSABC’s Code of Conduct and Ethics, to navigate social media using their best judgment.

Organizations should monitor social media use by its athletes and coaches and should consider regular surveys and reviews to understand how coaches and athletes are using social media. Coaches and athletes may need to be reminded that behaviour in social media is still subject to the CPSABC’s Code of Conduct and Ethics and Social Media Policy.

Complaints and concerns about an athlete’s or a coach’s conduct or behaviour in social media can be addressed under the CPSABC’s Discipline and Complaints Policy.


Download the Social Media Guidelines for Athletes and Coaches PDF

Travel Policy — Conditionally Approved

PURPOSE

The purpose of this Policy is to inform athletes, parents, performance partners/sport assistants and coaches travelling to events of their responsibilities and the expectations of the CPSABC.

 

APPLICATION OF THIS POLICY

Specific individuals have responsibilities when teams travel for tournaments. These individuals include:

  • Coaches
  • Athletes
  • Performance Partners/Sport Assistants
  • Sport Staff and Assistants
  • Team Managers
  • Parents traveling with the athlete as Team Members
  • Parents not traveling with the athlete but travelling as spectators

 

TRAVEL CONSENT FORM

Minor athletes (under 19 years of age) traveling with individuals other than their parent/guardian must keep with them a Minor Travel Consent Form (signed by their parent/guardian). A Minor Travel Consent Form is attached at the end of this Policy.

 

RESPONSIBILITIES

Coaches have the following responsibilities:

  • Arrange all team meetings and training sessions
  • Determine curfew times
  • Work with the performance partners on all sport and potentially non-sport matters
  • Report to the CPSABC any incident likely to bring discredit to the CPSABC
  • Together with the chaperones (and/or parents) decide temporary disciplinary action to be taken at the scene of an incident, and report such incident and action to the parents of the athletes involved as well as to the CPSABC for further disciplinary action, if applicable, under the CPSABC Discipline and Complaints Policy
  • Adhere to the CPSABC policies and procedures, particularly the Code of Conduct and Ethics

Athletes have the following responsibilities:

  • Arrive at each event ready to participate
  • Make any visitor requests to chaperones, Team Manager or Head Coach, whichever is applicable, before the visit is expected
  • Always represent the CPSABC to the best of their abilities
  • Communicate any problems or concerns to the coaches and chaperone
  • Minor athletes will check-in with the chaperone when leaving their rooms
  • Not leave the hotel alone or without permission of the Team Manager or Head Coach, whichever is applicable, and check-in when returning
  • Adhere to the CPSABC policies and procedures, particularly the Code of Conduct and Ethics, and Team Member Agreement
  • Selecting a performance partner (over 18 years of age) who is trained to meet their travel needs, and adhering to the Performance Partner Policy
  • Connect with Team Manager about any issues off the court
  • Connect with their direct coach about any issues on the court
  • Adhere to coach or manager requests for team meetings, or team functions and be punctual to such events
  • Adhere to coach requests for limiting outside activities (e.g., swimming, shopping)
  • Report any athlete illness or injury

Performance Partners/Sport Assistants of athletes under 18 years of age have the following responsibilities:

  • Obtain and carry any Minor Travel Consent Forms, emergency contact information, and medical information
  • Adhere to coach or manager requests for team meetings, or team functions and be punctual to such events
  • Adhere to coach requests for athlete curfew times
  • Adhere to coach requests for limiting outside activities (e.g., swimming, shopping)
  • Report any athlete illness or injury
  • Report any incident likely to bring discredit to the CPSABC
  • Inspect hotel rooms rented for damage before check-in and at check-out. Report any damage to the coach
  • Approve visitors to the athlete accommodations, at their discretion
  • Adhere to the CPSABC policies and procedures, particularly the Code of Conduct and Ethics

Team/Event Managers have the following responsibilities:

  • Organize accommodations and inform coaches, athletes, performance partners/sport assistants, parents and chaperones how to register and pay for accommodations
  • Room female and male athletes separately. Coaches must be roomed separately from athletes, unless the athlete is the child or spouse of the coach. Performance Partners/Sport Assistants may room with their designated athlete
  • Coordinate and collect all National Boccia Training Squad and/or event fees

Performance Partners/Sport Assistants or Parents traveling with their child who is an athlete (regardless of age) are responsible for their child during the entirety of the event and have the following additional responsibilities:

  • Pay all event fees prior to the start of travel
  • Register for event accommodations in a timely manner. Accommodations outside of those arranged by the manager (such as staying with family, or at a different hotel) must be approved by the coach in advance of arrangements being made
  • Punctual drop off and pick up of their children at times and places indicated by coaches, unless serving the role of Performance Partner/Sport Assistant
  • Adhere to coach or manager requests for parent meetings, team meetings, or team functions and be punctual to such events
  • Adhere to coach requests for athlete curfew times
  • Adhere to coach requests for limiting outside activities (e.g., swimming, shopping)
  • Report any athlete illness or injury
  • Report any incident likely to bring discredit to the CPSABC
  • Adhere to the CPSABC policies and procedures, particularly the Code of Conduct and Ethics
  • If travelling outside of Canada, ensure that all passports are valid and not expired or about to expire

Parents not traveling with the athlete under 18 years of age have the following responsibilities:

  • Assign to their child a chaperone from among the other parents in attendance. The chaperone may be a team coach, assistant coach, manager, performance partner/sport assistant
  • Provide the chaperone with a Minor Travel Consent Form
  • Provide the chaperone with emergency contact information
  • Provide the chaperone with any necessary medical information
  • Pay all event fees prior to the start of travel
  • Provide the child with enough funds to pay for food and incidentals
  • If travelling outside of Canada, ensure that all passports are valid and not expired or about to expire

APPENDIX A: MINOR TRAVEL CONSENT FORM

To whom it may concern,

I / we, the parent(s)/guardian(s) of officially give my / our consent for my / our minor child to travel with the following individuals who are also associated with the CPSABC:

My / our child was born on __________________ at the location of ______________________. If required, my / our child’s passport number is ______________________________. Attached to this form is a list of any additional medical needs my / our child requires.

I / we understand that the event is a _________________________which is located in _________________________.  Barring extenuating circumstances, the event should last for a duration of ____________ days between the dates of __________________ and __________________.

If there are any questions about the consent provided, I / we can be reached at the following telephone number(s) ______________________ and the following email addresses ____________________________________.

 

Sincerely,

_________________________ _________________________ _________________________

Name Signature Date

 

_________________________ _________________________ _________________________

Name Signature Date


Download the Travel Policy PDF

 

get in touch

Contact Us

 

Thank you for your interest. Feel free to call us or use the form below to reach us by email. We look forward to speaking with you.

Find Us

780 SW Marine Drive
Vancouver, BC V6P 5Y7

Phone: 604 324 1411

Email: info[at]sportabilitybc.ca

Stay Updated

Want to keep up-to-date on SportAbility news?

Follow us on our Facebook page, like us on Twitter, and follow us on Instagram!

Subscribe to our newsletter